SAVIGNY LES BEAUNE

2013 Domaine Nicolas Rossignol

IN STOCK
Grapes Pinot Noir
Colour Red
Origin France, Burgundy
District Côte d'Or
Sub-district Côte de Beaune
Village Savigny les Beaune
ABV 13%

This cuvée has all the Lavières and Fourneaux combined. Super rich fruit nose, plump and juicy, and terrific wine for a village, with really expressive fruit. Drinking range: 2016 - L&S (Nov 2014)

*Case price: Mix any 12 bottles of wine or 6 bottles of Champagne, Spirits or Fortified to get the 'case price' for each bottle.

(two-thirds of the blend is from the 1er vineyards of Lavières and Fourneaux with the remainder from the villages portion of Fourneaux). This is also quite earthy and brooding with a noticeably floral character to the array of various dark berry fruit aromas. There is excellent density to the serious and robust medium weight flavors that do evidence a hint of dryness but this, in its fashion, is offset by the superb depth and length, indeed it is rare to find this kind of depth in a villages level Savigny even if it’s clear why. Worth considering even if the balance is not perfect. 2020+ Rating: 88-91 Allen Meadows, www.Burghound.com(Apr 2015)

(two-thirds Fourneux and one-third Lavières): Dark red. Slightly roasted aromas of dark fruits and leather. Fat, rich and sweet if a bit rustic, showing good weight to its flavors of redcurrant, iron and leather. Finishes with a salty element, a repeating leathery nuance and slightly autumnal tannins. Drinking range: 2017 - 2022 Rating: 86-88 Stephen Tanzer, www.vinousmedia.com(Jan 2015)

The 2013 Savigny-les-Beaune Village is actually a blend of all Nicolas Rossignol’s vineyards, both premier and village cru. It has a focused bouquet with floral black fruits and a touch of seaweed – quite complex and engaging already. The palate is medium-bodied with chalky tannins, a brisk line of acidity and a grippy and quite masculine finish. I think blending everything together was a good move. Drinking range: 2016 - 2022 Rating: 87-89 Neal Martin, www.robertparker.com(Dec 2014)

Somewhat sweet and ripe fruit aroma. Fullish and rounded with 2/3 premier cru and the remainder village. The yields were so small here, all has gone into village. Quite a grippy palate; slightly dry tannins; lots of ripe fruit mid palate, though slightly baked red fruit. Nicolas used no stems, “they were dry..harsh stems. I could not find any whole cluster I liked..always a part of the bunch I didn’t like. You have to be able to use the whole bunch and not cut out anything.” Rating: 14.85 Sarah Marsh MW, The Burgundy Briefing(Nov 2014)

Domaine Nicolas Rossignol

Born in 1974, Nicolas represents the fifth generation of his family in Volnay (a village which seems to be populated almost entirely by families with Rossignol somewhere in the name). He started to make the wines of his 'Rossignol-Jeanniard' family domaine when he was just twenty.

After studies at the Lycée viticole in Beaune, he worked with Joseph Voillot in Volnay, who became a mentor to him, for Louis Latour at their estate in the Ardèche, and for Vieux Télégraphe on Châteauneuf, where he loved the combination of richness and elegance in the wines, which influenced the style of wines he would later want to make himself. He also made wine in Boschendal in South Africa, and for Château la Cardonne in Bordeaux (then managed by the Lafite team).

In 1997, Nico started his own domaine with three hectares of vines inherited from an uncle. After a period in which some of the wines he made were labelled 'Domaine Rossignol-Jeanniard', and some 'Domaine Nicolas Rossignol', he began to buy the fruit from his (Rossignol-Jeanniard) family, and label these simply 'Nicolas Rossignol' (without the 'domaine'). Now the vines (all 16 hectares) are finally in the 'Domaine Nicolas Rossignol', and labelled as such. Phew! To handle this sizeable domaine, Nico needed a new winery. Having started with a chaotic assemblage of tanks in a building in the village of Volnay, he had moved to share Ben Leroux's winery on the Beaune ring road, but Nico had dreams of his own place and built his impressive new winery in 2016. A fantastic bespoke build, admittedly in a ZI (Zone Industrielle) on the outskirts of Beaune, which he recognises is not ideal for the 'folklore' aspect, it is a perfect tool for the job, and does have a good view of all 'his' bit of the Côte - from a sort of eyrie on the roof.

Like many Burgundy domaines, the appellations have proliferated as the surface area of the vineyard has increased with lots of little (and some quite large) parcels of vines in Aloxe ('village'), Savigny ('village' and two Premiers Crus), Beaune (three Premiers Crus), Pernand ('village' and one Premier Cru), Pommard (three 'village' wines and six Premiers Crus) and Volnay ('village' and seven Premiers Crus). With two cuvées of Bourgogne Rouge, this adds up to twenty-eight different wines. Like Burgundy more generally, the joy of tasting here is recognising the individual character of each plot, modulated by the conditions of the vintage, of course, but each with their own distinct personality

The viticulture of the domaine is inspired by biodynamics, but Nico is pragmatic, and although no weedkillers are used and the vineyards are maintained by ploughing, he says that there are both good and bad things in biodynamics, and he will use conventional fungicides to combat disease. At harvest time the grapes are picked into eight kilo boxes, and transported to the winery in them to minimise handling. They are then carefully sorted, before either being de-stemmed (but with the berries left intact) before being put in the fermentation vat, or put in directly as whole bunches. Nico uses varying proportions of whole bunch fermentation depending on the type of wine each vineyard gives, and of course on the health and 'ripeness' of the stems. A classic fermentation using the natural yeats on the grapes ensues, with punchdowns (pigeage) and pumpovers (remontage) used to extract flavour from the grapes, or to oxygenate the wine and refine its structure - the amount used judged by tastings throughout the process. After the vatting the free-run juice is separated from the pressed juice - the latter being blended back as required if necessary after tasting. The wine is put into barrel by gravity (with the amount of new wood between 0 and 50%), and aged for between ten and twenty months depending on the wine and the vintage, always on the lees without racking. The wood and the amount of heat used in making the barrels is also modulated for each wine. The malolactic fermentation is delayed for six months to increase aromatic complexity and structure to the wines. At the end of the ageing the wines are racked and blended in tank, before bottling without fining or filtration.

Nicolas makes deeply-coloured, flavourful wines. He is always keen to rubbish the generalisation that Pommard makes structured 'masculine' wines, as opposed to Volnay's supposed 'feminine' ones, and proves his point with Pommards grown on clay and Volnays like his punchily structured 'Ronceret'. Each wine is very site-specific. Great winemaking here from a domaine that is really hitting its stride after many years of disappointing yields caused by hail and frost.

This wine isn't currently part of a mixed case, but you can always browse our full selection of mixed cases here.
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